Mississippi

Pro Tip Thursday: 12.29.16

Nothing says the holidays like eating your bodyweight in foods you really don't care about just because you're bored. I use that apathetic energy, bloat, and self loathing to create more Team Infirmary Pro Tip videos for all you strength and conditioning, powerlifting, and olympic weightlifting nerds out there.

Enjoy the last two week's worth of videos (I know you probably missed last week's while you were preparing your body for stale popcorn and brownies) below.

Spoiler alert: this week's compilation (12.29.16) has me dancing and singing. And trying on homecoming dresses.

In case you missed last week's Team Infirmary Pro Tip mashup because you were busy stuffing your face and waiting on Santa, check it out above.


This week's compilation of Pro Tips for all powerlifters, olympic lifters, and sports performance connoisseurs. 


New videos are uploaded daily in my Instagram story (@sheppardstrength) but I put some extras into the YouTube channel to reward you sad, souls who plow through them. I'm kidding, you aren't sad. You are actually validating my existence.

Post your own videos online, tag me, and use #TeamInfirmary so I can see them.

Is this a subject you need advice on and want to hear my Pro Tip about it? Comment below or shoot me a message so we can address it this week.

Pro Tip Thursday: 12.08.16

I've been injured for a few months so I decided to poke fun of myself and internet "fitness gurus". I created "Team Infirmary" as a joke--it doesn't actually exist in real life....just in injured folks' hearts.

Member Of Team Infirmary Since 2008 When A Van Ran Me Over And I Had An Eating Disorder

Member Of Team Infirmary Since 2008 When A Van Ran Me Over And I Had An Eating Disorder

Every day I post a new "tip" on my Instagram story which usually isn't a tip at all, references feeling dead inside, or features my catdog being weird.

Each Thursday I compile the previous week's Tips and will be posting them here (and on my YouTube channel).

Enjoy!



What did you think of the tips? Were any helpful? Did some jokes fall flat? Comment here, on facebook, or on the YouTube video and let us know.

Join in on the fun and make your own Pro Tip videos! Tag us @sheppardstrength and #TeamInfirmary so we can see them on Instagram. Friend us on facebook and tag us there too so we can make sure we see them.

Maybe we'll repost some of them in a compilation video next week.

Have any questions? You can always message us. If you watched the video you can see we clearly have no life.

Tuesday Ten: Meet Essentials

Every Tuesday I'll be channeling my inner David Letterman with a Top 10 List for the "Tuesday Ten" blog post. Will it be exercises, recipes, lifters? Maybe my favorite memes? Only time will tell.

Top 10 Meet Essentials

"Gee, Amber. You really broke the mold on this one. What a cliche topic to write about..."

Look here, Sassy Pants. Those other lists didn't have the self deprecating, comedy gems Amber's list is about to throw at you.

So sit back, relax, and eye roll so hard you strain your retinas.

1. Waffle House Grilled Chicken and a Waffle

Why? There's a Waffle House (or it's step-brother equivalent Huddle House) almost everywhere so no matter where your meet is, you'll always be able to find one for your post weigh-in meal. What's even better is the waiter/waitress will think you're insane for ordering the chicken. But trust me, it's a life changer. #BlessedBeThyChicken

2. Reese's Fastbreak

No. Not a Reese's Cup. That's too much work to peel off the paper. Save your digits for that PR you're about to hit. Get the giant Fastbreak and thank me later.

3. Your Obnoxious Singlet

I have a Space Galaxy Dance Biketard. Don't snicker at me, that's what unitards with legs on them are called. $30 from dance stores. Suck it Adidas (just kidding!)

Fun fact: I actually bring an extra singlet with me to every meet just in case something happens. I actually even bring one when I'm coaching just in case my athlete forgets theirs after 7,890 reminders from me. I've let folks borrow a singlet at a meet I've been at before too.

4. Your Team Shirt

If you belong to a team, then bring your Team shirt for Introductions and lifting. If you're lucky enough to medal wear it on the podium.

If you belong to a Team and wear another company or gym's shirt then you just slapped your team, coaches, and team mates in the face. UNLESS you are under sponsorship obligations.

5. Your ID

You aren't famous. No one knows, or cares, who you are. Especially the weigh in official. Bring your ID with you. And don't get uppity if someone asks you for it; you aren't a special snowflake. Rules are rules.

6. Extra Set Of Clothes

If you're at a meet, then chances are you're going to sweat. If you don't we need to talk and you may need to a trained doctor to see what is going on with your body. But you'll sweat. Bring clothes (including your unmentionables) to change into you if you aren't going home after the event so your significant other doesn't disown you.

7. Headphones

No one wants to hear your music. It probably sucks. Bring headphones. The bigger the better. It tells the other lifters you hate yourself.

8. A Good Attitude

Have fun. Make lifts. Some folks take their meets so seriously. Don't get me wrong: be focused. But on meet day don't be a d**k to everyone. Don't yell at the officials or volunteers. Smile and be merry.

9. Your Attempt Selections

Have your openers ready to go at weigh ins (in pounds or kilos dependent on the federation). Have your warm ups and 2nd/3rd attempt plan written down ahead of time.

10. Your Dog

Check with the gym and event director on this before you do it. There's nothing magical about this but if I happen to be at your event, then I would want to pet it. Bring me all the puppies and I'm sure you will PR.


Did you agree with this list? Disagree? Comment below and let me have it either way. Want to hear about a certain topic next week? Let me know here or send me an email!

Stay tuned for tomorrow's Wordless Wednesday... or go back in the Blog and check out older pieces. You can always mosey on over to the Archives to read my nationally published articles too.

Follow me on Instagram @sheppardstrength to see more comedic gems and the occasional training video.

Inability To Outsource Could Lead Your Gym To Failure

Every gym owner feels his gym is the best on the block. That's not a problem; be proud of your work. But if you think you know everything & couldn't benefit from another set of eyes or ears then you're letting your ego stunt your growth as a coach. You are also stunting your athletes' growth.

Doctors bring in outside help all the time. An orthopedic surgeon isn't going to try to do brain surgery: he is going to call in a competent neurosurgeon ( I can't guarantee he will look like Derek Shepherd though).

If other professions call in hired guns when they need help, why can't some gym owners seem to pick up the phone and do the same? We explore that issue below and discuss why they can harm your facility.

1. Pride/Fear Of Failure

Some coaches want to be seen as infallible. They feel like they are looked down upon if they attend an event they aren't an expert in or ask for another coach's advice. That's the farthest thing from the truth. Anyone worth their salt would view asking for help when you need it as an attribute to being a successful coach, not a failure.

Knowing your limits as a coach doesn't mean you can't continue to hone and build your skill set. You want to bridge those limitation gaps with education & knowledge.

But if your athlete has outgrown your coaching level, be man (or woman) enough to find some help. There are certain athletes I could only help so much with where I was; in order to not hinder their growth as an athlete I helped find a new coach who could do more than I could at the time.

If you are just starting out and need help with your business model why wouldn't you seek counsel of someone who has done it before? There's a lot of trial and error in business ownership but by seeking guidance you can lessen the falls you have to take. When we first started Mississippi Barbell we had plenty of mentors, including 2004 US Olympic Coach Gayle Hatch.

Image Source: Daniel McKnatt

Image Source: Daniel McKnatt

 

Utilizing someone to do your day to day tasks like media posts or website content, just like you do for bookkeeping, can help free up your time to focus on coaching. Otherwise you'll burn out quickly and some things will fall through the cracks.

Don't let your ego stand in the way of your business.

2. Inability To Recognize Peers

Certain sports pride themselves on community. While that may be true for some businesses and athletes, it's not true for all. In towns with dozens of gyms a gym owner wants his to stand out. There's nothing inherently wrong with that.

But if you're a gym located in an area where there are experts in a field you aren't strong in, why wouldn't you learn from them? If an athlete wanted to become really great at ring work and your main focus is weightlifting, then you should help find them someone in the area who is great at gymnastics.

If your athletes have issues with the olympic lifts, then why wouldn't you team up with an organization that focuses on those? Either shadow their coaches or set up a clinic in your facility.

Listening to peers or offering your own advice (like seen here at Mississippi College School Of Law) helps grow the community

Listening to peers or offering your own advice (like seen here at Mississippi College School Of Law) helps grow the community

 

Either way, the coaches involved should be able to recognize the value of the other coach. There is an opportunity for both to learn in either situation. So long as they are professional they have an opportunity to have a "skull session". When coaches continually refuse to better their athlete then that athlete may leave their facility. That coach can then develop a reputation of being hostile.

3. Inability To Allow Current Staff To Grow

As a gym owner you should never discourage continuing education. While there should be an in house curriculum for your trainers, there are also many opportunities to learn and grow outside your walls.

If a coach asks to shadow you or another trainer in your facility I hope you've been saying yes. If not then you need to seriously ask yourself why you're in this field.

You can't be an expert at everything so don't discourage learning from someone else. And don't be upset if you refuse your potential staff and athletes shadowing opportunities and they go elsewhere.

A true leader will want their staff to grow and do better than they have. Seriously.

Shadowing International USAW Coach Danny Camargo, along with Tyler Smith, at my first National meet as a coach

Shadowing International USAW Coach Danny Camargo, along with Tyler Smith, at my first National meet as a coach

 

Stunt their growth and you'll find your coaches will be leaving you to form their own gyms. In some instances it may be inevitable but that doesn't mean they have to leave with the bridges up in flames. If you do your job right and earn your staff's respect and don't stunt their growth, then they will continue to represent your brand in a good light throughout their career. I still mention my high school coach and mentor (Chris Lachney) and it's been a hot minute since I studied under him.


Coaches lead their athletes by example. If you want your athletes to listen to you then you should be willing and able to listen to others. Outsource tasks that aren't necessary for you to do, allow them to seek help from other coaches in fields you don't excel at, and continue your own education yearly. Your members will thank you by staying and referring you to others.

Looking to shadow a coach or want to schedule an consultation? Email us at sheppardstrength@gmail.com and follow us on Instagram @sheppardstrength